North Shore Private Hospital
Part of Ramsay Health Care

North Shore Private Hospital, Castlecrag Private Hospital, Hunters Hill Private Hospital specialist LEO PANG

DR LEO PANG

BS (Med) MBBS FRACS (OHNS)

Dr Leo Pang specialises in General Adults’ and Children’s Ear Nose and Throat Surgery, Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, Salivary Gland Surgery and Thyroid Surgery. Other interests are Snoring and Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

Dr Leo Pang specialises in General Adults’ and Children’s Ear Nose and Throat Surgery, Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, Salivary Gland Surgery and Thyroid Surgery. Other interests are Snoring and Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

Leo graduated from the University of New South Wales Medical School, and underwent specialist training in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery under the auspices of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. He then completed a fellowship programme in Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Surgery and Reconstruction at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals and King’s College University Hospital in London, United Kingdom. He trained under the mentorship of Dr Ricard Simo and Dr Jean-Pierre Jeannon in one of the largest cancer centres in the UK and Europe, and lectured at King’s College London. He is experienced in managing cutaneous cancers, sinonasal cancers, cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx, thyroid cancer, and salivary gland cancers.

 

Leo is part of the Head and Neck Oncology and Cancer Multidisciplinary Team at Royal North Shore Hospital, and actively participates in the weekly clinical meetings to discuss management of Head and Neck Cancer patients.

 

Leo has published numerous research articles and has presented at various national and international cancer conferences in Australia, United Kingdom and Europe. He is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and Australasian Society of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, and member of the Australian and New Zealand Head and Neck Cancer Society. He is actively involved in the teaching of medical students and ENT advanced trainee registrars.

 

He is fluent in Cantonese.

 

Dr Leo Pang Q&A

 

Neck Masses

 

What do neck masses commonly arise from?
Neck masses commonly arise from lymph nodes or salivary glands. Depending on the anatomical position it can be difficult to differentiate between the two.

 

What causes neck masses?
Benign infective cervical lymphadenopathy is the most common cause of neck masses. They are usually tender, and resolve within 2-3 weeks. Persistent neck masses should be thoroughly investigated to exclude neoplasms.

 

How should persistent neck masses be managed?
Any neck masses that persist beyond 3 weeks should be investigated to exclude neoplastic causes, especially in high risk patients, or where the cause is not apparent. A thorough physical examination of the sinonasal cavities, upper areodigestive tract, and head and neck regions must be performed if secondary cervical metastases is suspected. Imaging with ultrasound or CT, with a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) should be performed.

 

When is surgery indicated for neck masses?
Generally if the FNAB is non-diagnostic, or if there is any doubt of the diagnosis, an excisional biopsy may be required for diagnostic purposes. Masses arising from salivary glands are most likely to be benign pleomorphic adenomas, although these can undergo malignant transformation. The most common malignant lesion in the parotid gland in Australia is metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Unless there are medical contraindications, complete and full excision of salivary gland masses is recommended.

Rhinology, Head and Neck Cancer Surgery
Mandarin